A new SAS course for all SAS Programmers is now starting in my SAS Programming Forum

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I’ve seen self-paced SAS courses for around $125 / R.7,000. My new course will be priced at £5 (about $7 / R.475) per month and details can be found here, and you’ll be able to ask me any questions you need answers to at the same time, so it will be cheaper to become a member for 12 months than register for just one self-paced course!

Course topics during the year will include:

  • Data Steps
  • PROC SQL
  • Macros
  • PROC REPORT
  • PROC TABULATE
  • Reading databases
  • Reading text files
  • ODS destinations
  • ODS GRAPHICS
  • Performance considerations
  • Platform differences

The first two topics from the course looking generally at SAS components have been published today:

Still interested, then subscribe now for the SAS Programming Forum here !!

PhUSE SDE (Single Day Event) in Utrecht, Netherlands

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This will be the first PhUSE SDE to be held in the Netherlands since the first SDE was held in Switzerland in 2008, and will focus on Data Visualization. I will be presenting a paper on my favourite SAS-related topic of ODS Graphics entitled “Converting Plots from SAS/GRAPH to ODS Graphics”.

To celebrate the publication of my latest book “SAS Programming and Data Visualization Techniques: A Power User’s Guide”, you will be able to win a copy in a free prize draw to be held on the day.

Full details will be made available before the event at http://www.phuse.eu/Netherlands2016.aspx

Skills needed by a good SAS programmer apart from programming

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You have a certificate from SAS saying you can program, and you have been offered a job as a SAS programmer. Well done! So what happens now?

Hopefully your new employer will arrange for SAS training for you, and then you’ll be given a computer to run your SAS programs on. If you are lucky you’ll be in a team of SAS programmers where some are experienced enough to assist you. However, your team may only include inexperienced programmers like yourself, so how do you get answers to your questions?

Do:
(1) Research: Search Google for possible answers to your questions. This may produce links to http://support.sas.com or http://www.lexjansen.com, so try these links first.
(2) Experiment: Try out these suggestions to see which work for your situation.
(3) Discuss: Talk about these solutions with your colleagues.

Do not:
(1) Delegate: Post vague questions on forums in the hope that someone will write your program for you. You will never improve your skills by using someone else to do it for you.
(2) Break copyright: Post any company data on the web or in external emails.
(3) Reveal: Ask questions on the web which may reveal confidential information about your employers or clients. It is also recommended that you never post your email address or phone number either, because they could be used to spam you, or even to spam others looking as if you are doing it.

Once you have a working SAS program, and this may take a while to achieve, remember to re-visit it regularly with a view to improving it using knowledge you’ve gained over time. No program is ever perfect, but your aim should be to approach perfection with each amendment.

So how do you gain SAS knowledge? The SAS certification questions and answers cover only a tiny fraction of what SAS can do. The temptation is to stick to what you know, but this will never allow you to improve your SAS programming, so read the SAS blogs, SAS-related forums and SAS conference papers regularly, and then try out the new techniques to learn new stuff all the time. This should never end. I’ve been using SAS since 1981 and I’m still learning new stuff about SAS every day!

SAS Programming and Data Visualization Techniques: A Power User’s Guide – paperback and ebooks

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SAS Programming and Data Visualization Techniques: A Power User’s Guide brings together a wealth of ideas about strategic and tactical solutions to everyday situations experienced when transferring, extracting, processing, analyzing, and reporting the valuable data you have at your fingertips. Best, you can achieve most of the solutions using the SAS components you already license, meaning that with this book’s insights can keep you from throwing money at problems needlessly.

Published in August 2015.

SAS-related ebook apps have recently been published on Android devices and Chrome and Chromium browsers

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The following SAS-related ebook apps have recently been published on Android devices (Google Play [name in brackets] and Amazon Appstore) and Chrome and Chromium browsers (Chrome Web Store):

  • How Do You Do this in SAS? – free functional sample app – version 2.4
  • Consulting: How Do You Do This in SAS? [Consulting: Do This in SAS?] – free samples from the paid apps – version 1.2
  • Data Steps: How Do You Do This in SAS? [Data Steps: Do This in SAS?] – Q&A about Data Steps – version 3.3
  • SQL: How Do You Do This in SAS? [SQL: Do This in SAS?] – Q&A about PROC SQL – version 2.3
  • Graphs: How Do You Do This in SAS? [Graphs: Do This in SAS?] – Q&A about SAS/GRAPH and ODS Graphics – version 1.5
  • Platforms: How Do You Do This in SAS? [Platforms: Do This in SAS?] – Q&A about using SAS on Windows, UNIX, Linux, and z/OS, with differences caused by 32-bit and 64-bit versions too – version 3.5
  • EG: How Do You Do This in SAS? [EG: Do This in SAS?] – Q&A about Enterprise Guide – version 2.4
  • Macros: How Do You Do This in SAS? [Macros: Do This in SAS?] – Q&A about SAS Macros – version 2.3
  • Efficiency: How Do You Do This in SAS? [Efficiency: Do This in SAS?} – Q&A about SAS programming efficiency – version 2.4
  • Studio: How Do You Do This in SAS? [Studio: Do This in SAS?] – Q&A about SAS Studio and SAS University Edition – version 1.1

Just search on your preferred Android or Chrome platform for “Do This in SAS”, and you should find these 10 apps. Note that any new updates may increase the prices of these apps, so, if you buy them now, you will pay nothing more for upgrades!