Recent posts

Skills needed by a good SAS programmer apart from programming

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You have a certificate from SAS saying you can program, and you have been offered a job as a SAS programmer. Well done! So what happens now?

Hopefully your new employer will arrange for SAS training for you, and then you’ll be given a computer to run your SAS programs on. If you are lucky you’ll be in a team of SAS programmers where some are experienced enough to assist you. However, your team may only include inexperienced programmers like yourself, so how do you get answers to your questions?

Do:
(1) Research: Search Google for possible answers to your questions. This may produce links to http://support.sas.com or http://www.lexjansen.com, so try these links first.
(2) Experiment: Try out these suggestions to see which work for your situation.
(3) Discuss: Talk about these solutions with your colleagues.

Do not:
(1) Delegate: Post vague questions on forums in the hope that someone will write your program for you. You will never improve your skills by using someone else to do it for you.
(2) Break copyright: Post any company data on the web or in external emails.
(3) Reveal: Ask questions on the web which may reveal confidential information about your employers or clients. It is also recommended that you never post your email address or phone number either, because they could be used to spam you, or even to spam others looking as if you are doing it.

Once you have a working SAS program, and this may take a while to achieve, remember to re-visit it regularly with a view to improving it using knowledge you’ve gained over time. No program is ever perfect, but your aim should be to approach perfection with each amendment.

So how do you gain SAS knowledge? The SAS certification questions and answers cover only a tiny fraction of what SAS can do. The temptation is to stick to what you know, but this will never allow you to improve your SAS programming, so read the SAS blogs, SAS-related forums and SAS conference papers regularly, and then try out the new techniques to learn new stuff all the time. This should never end. I’ve been using SAS since 1981 and I’m still learning new stuff about SAS every day!

Where did you hear about this Blog site?

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In order to determine the best way to advertise this Blog and Forums site, like all data analysts, I need to collect together some data to analyse. This is why I’ve created the poll below, so I hope you will help me by voting. Note that you will be able to vote for more than one option, so you shouldn’t have to decide between them.

Where did you hear about this Blog site?

  • LinkedIn: SAS Professional Forum (37%, 10 Votes)
  • LinkedIn: SAS Author: Philip R Holland (22%, 6 Votes)
  • None of these (11%, 3 Votes)
  • LinkedIn: SAS Freshers (7%, 2 Votes)
  • LinkedIn: sasCommunity (4%, 1 Votes)
  • LinkedIn: SAS University Edition (4%, 1 Votes)
  • Google+: SAS Professional Forum (4%, 1 Votes)
  • Twitter (4%, 1 Votes)
  • Email from friend or colleague (4%, 1 Votes)
  • Web search (4%, 1 Votes)
  • LinkedIn: from Pulse, from status or in another group (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 19

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What sort of a SAS user are you?

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In order to target my Blog and Forum entries appropriately for the members here, like all data analysts, I need to collect together some data to analyse. This is why I’ve created the poll below, so I hope you will help me by voting. Note that you will only be able to vote for one option, so please select carefully before voting. There is a [Vote] button above the [View Results] link that may be difficult to see, until your cursor moves over it, in some browsers.

What sort of a SAS user are you?

  • Power User (54%, 21 Votes)
  • Intermediate or Novice Programmer (23%, 9 Votes)
  • Academic User or Student (13%, 5 Votes)
  • Non-programming Data Analyst (8%, 3 Votes)
  • Interface Developer for Enterprise Guide or SAS Studio (3%, 1 Votes)
  • None of these (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 39

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Book Promotion Photo Gallery

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June 2018: Congratulations to Igor Khorlo who won my new book in the Prize Draw at SAS Forum UK in Birmingham
April 2018: Congratulations to Chris Smith who won my new book in the Prize Draw at the SUGUKI meeting in London
September 2017: Congratulations to Peter Lowes who won my new book in the Prize Draw at SAS Forum UK in Birmingham
April 2017: Congratulations to Matthew Hoolsema who won my new book in the Prize Draw at SAS Global Forum in Orlando
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October 2016: Congratulations to Cathal Gallagher who won my new book in the Prize Draw at the PhUSE Conference in Barcelona
Congratulations to Charlotte King who won my new book in the Prize Draw at the SAS Forum UK in Birmingham
September 2016: Congratulations to Charlotte King who won my new book in the Prize Draw at the SAS Forum UK in Birmingham
Congratulations to Olivier Goethals who won my new book in the Prize Draw at SAS Global Forum in Las Vegas
April 2016: Congratulations to Olivier Goethals who won my new book in the Prize Draw at SAS Global Forum in Las Vegas
Congratulations to Angelo Tinazzi who won my new book in the Prize Draw at PhUSE in Vienna
October 2015: Congratulations to Angelo Tinazzi, who won my new book in the Prize Draw at the PhUSE Conference in Vienna. Thanks go to Ian Marlow from the CK Group for running the competition.
Happiness: my new book, a beer and my advertising shirt at the book launch in Cambridge
September 2015: Happiness = my new book, a beer and my advertising shirt at the book launch in Cambridge

SAS Programming and Data Visualization Techniques: A Power User’s Guide – paperback and ebooks

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SAS Programming and Data Visualization Techniques: A Power User’s Guide brings together a wealth of ideas about strategic and tactical solutions to everyday situations experienced when transferring, extracting, processing, analyzing, and reporting the valuable data you have at your fingertips. Best, you can achieve most of the solutions using the SAS components you already license, meaning that with this book’s insights can keep you from throwing money at problems needlessly.

Published in August 2015.

SAS-related ebook apps have recently been published on Android devices and Chrome and Chromium browsers

Total views 2,310 

The following SAS-related ebook apps have recently been published on Android devices (Google Play [name in brackets] and Amazon Appstore) and Chrome and Chromium browsers (Chrome Web Store):

  • How Do You Do this in SAS? – free functional sample app – version 2.4
  • Consulting: How Do You Do This in SAS? [Consulting: Do This in SAS?] – free samples from the paid apps – version 1.2
  • Data Steps: How Do You Do This in SAS? [Data Steps: Do This in SAS?] – Q&A about Data Steps – version 3.3
  • SQL: How Do You Do This in SAS? [SQL: Do This in SAS?] – Q&A about PROC SQL – version 2.3
  • Graphs: How Do You Do This in SAS? [Graphs: Do This in SAS?] – Q&A about SAS/GRAPH and ODS Graphics – version 1.5
  • Platforms: How Do You Do This in SAS? [Platforms: Do This in SAS?] – Q&A about using SAS on Windows, UNIX, Linux, and z/OS, with differences caused by 32-bit and 64-bit versions too – version 3.5
  • EG: How Do You Do This in SAS? [EG: Do This in SAS?] – Q&A about Enterprise Guide – version 2.4
  • Macros: How Do You Do This in SAS? [Macros: Do This in SAS?] – Q&A about SAS Macros – version 2.3
  • Efficiency: How Do You Do This in SAS? [Efficiency: Do This in SAS?} – Q&A about SAS programming efficiency – version 2.4
  • Studio: How Do You Do This in SAS? [Studio: Do This in SAS?] – Q&A about SAS Studio and SAS University Edition – version 1.1

Just search on your preferred Android or Chrome platform for “Do This in SAS”, and you should find these 10 apps. Note that any new updates may increase the prices of these apps, so, if you buy them now, you will pay nothing more for upgrades!